GPS methodology

27 Jan 2016 09:40 #66692 by AndrewP
GPS methodology was created by AndrewP
Up to now, I have always used a ROUTE to link waypoints as a way of navigating in the hills with my GPS. It takes effort to set up the waypoint locations in an optimal position, but once set up, the GPS "compass" feature works like a dream. Every Garmin GPS on the market has a limit of 250 waypoints per route. I can just manage a GT or the X-Berg if I am carefull.

But, I am planning something a bit bigger and the 250 limit is becoming an issue.

After half a dozen trips to Navworld in Randburg, I have been led to the following conclusions:
- apparently the solution is to use a TRACK;
- my experience with tracks is that I literally cannot navigate around Delta Park without getting lost. A Garmin GPS just cannot use the compass feature to say how far away and the direction to the next waypoint if I follow a track;
- the staff at Navworld have conflicting ideas and theory, and based on my experience compared to their comments. It is obvious to me that none of them has ever used a GPS in the countryside before;

So, we now come to the point of my post. Does anyone know how to navigate following a track on their Garmin GPS or alternatively know anywhere I can go to get proper training for this?

(My specific request is actually very simple: the compass on the GPS must point to the next waypoint and tell me the distance to go. It must not point to the waypoint 5km ago)

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27 Jan 2016 10:44 #66693 by Stijn
Replied by Stijn on topic GPS methodology
Andrew, I'm sure you've considered/tested this, but does following the track line on the map screen work for you? i.e. You can see which direction you need to head in to keep your current spot along the line and can also very quickly see if you happen to start drifting off of it.
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27 Jan 2016 11:17 - 27 Jan 2016 11:18 #66695 by ghaznavid
Replied by ghaznavid on topic GPS methodology

AndrewP wrote: my experience with tracks is that I literally cannot navigate around Delta Park without getting lost. A Garmin GPS just cannot use the compass feature to say how far away and the direction to the next waypoint if I follow a track;

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

I take your point though - I climbed some arb 2700m peak in Lesotho behind Thlanyako Pass while trying to follow a track line instead of a point in the mist. I then told my GPS to take me to Didima Dome and had no difficulty getting to the saddle I was looking for (even though I didn't go within 1km of the peak). Also memories of "6km to go"...

How about setting up multiple routes? Surely the GPS can handle this.

Getting to the top is nothing, the way you do it is everything – Royal Robins
Last edit: 27 Jan 2016 11:18 by ghaznavid.
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27 Jan 2016 14:22 - 27 Jan 2016 14:25 #66697 by tonymarshall
Replied by tonymarshall on topic GPS methodology
Andrew, if you open the waypoint manager function on your gps, all your waypoints are listed, in order from nearest to furthest, and have a direction arrow/compass direction indicated as well. I find this function very useful, and trust this will benefit you. In the waypoint manager, you can also select a waypoint, and using the 'goto' function it will show a line/direction and distance to the waypoint.

I also use Stijn's method of following a track a lot - it's easy with topo maps and basecamp to draw in a track of your intended route, or use someone elses track etc - and then just follow it on your gps screen.
Last edit: 27 Jan 2016 14:25 by tonymarshall.
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27 Jan 2016 14:47 #66698 by AndrewP
Replied by AndrewP on topic GPS methodology
Thanks guys

@ Stijn
You may recall at the screening of the Redbull film for their GT, Ryno mentioned that his eyes never left the GPS. I do not want to do this. I want to look at the view. I thus set my GPS to point to something about 1km away, say the next saddle. I line myself up to that, ditch the GPS and navigate by my eyes. This uses less time to navigate and also gives a more efficient line through the countryside. Over an entire GT, this is probably worth several hours. Also of course, the compass arrow fills the whole screen and I see useful info such as distance to go, current speed and altitude. Compared to an arrow smaller than a grain of rice on the map screen.

@ Tony
Believe it or not, but that is the "best" the guys at navworld can suggest. Now, if you want to bag 100+ khulus and 100+ saddles on a single GT, sooner or later you are going to miss something out. Not to mention the frustration of having to choose a "new target" 40 times in a day. I used this a few times in the GT with Ghaz last year as a way of telling us the straight line distance remaining that day to the target cave. So, it has uses, but not this time.

@ Ghaz
In MapSource it was easy to do exactly that. Have multiple routes, edit them easily if needed and transfer to your GPS (which can handle plenty enough routes). But, in Basecamp, the route is renamed automatically everytime you blink your eye to be "start" to "finish". Now, if you can tell me whether I should use route "International Boundary 17 to River 4" vs "3200m 1 to International Boundary 32", then I will accept that this can work. Yes, but to make it a viable option I probably need to edit the route in Mapsource and then get it into Basecamp and then transfer to the GPS (which epic as it sounds may be the only option)

PS. To complement the route on the GPS, I do also include a track if available so that I can find a path that i missed for example by then switching to map screen and zooming in enough. I also have the contour maps on the screen, which are very handy for seeing if you are supposed to aim for a valley or follow a ridge. And of course, the contours provide an easy way to "link" the GPS to a paper based map so that I can find a cave for example for which I do not have an actual waypoint on the GPS

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27 Jan 2016 16:17 #66699 by Riaang
Replied by Riaang on topic GPS methodology
Andrew, why don't you break your GT up into more than one route? That way you can have 250 waypoints times by the number of routes you create. Use the same name for each route, just add say an "A", "B", "C" etc. at the end of the name to differentiate. I've done tis for overlanding trips or bike trips and it works quite well. Not due to the 250 waypoint limit though, but I generally create a route per day, for statistical purposes this works well for me.
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27 Jan 2016 18:13 #66700 by ghaznavid
Replied by ghaznavid on topic GPS methodology
My old yellow GPS also used to do that - it rather annoying. I will play around with my current GPS for ideas.

Ps. looking forward to a writeup about your most recent adventure :thumbsup:

Getting to the top is nothing, the way you do it is everything – Royal Robins

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