Hiking stoves

25 May 2010 10:41 #1312 by ray
ray created the topic: Hiking stoves
Has anyone used Jet-boil cookers/Boilers in the Berg - do they work at altitude?

Thanks!

Ray

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25 May 2010 15:29 - 25 May 2010 15:30 #1314 by anthony
anthony replied to: Hiking stoves
Hi Ray,

I have not used the jet boil,but my experience at higher altitude and cold weather is that most gas products don't work to well, even my windmill lighter,i am considering getting myself i zippo instead.

The only gas stove that works well will be the one where the cylinder is inverted,in other words you are not relying on the gas but rather the gas in a liquid form.
Last Edit: 25 May 2010 15:30 by anthony.

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25 May 2010 16:29 #1315 by intrepid
intrepid replied to: Hiking stoves
It is true that gas cookers can be sluggish in colder temperatures. However, I have used my Jetboil in the Berg extensively and have not had major issues, even after nights where the water in your water bottle freezes inside your tent. One can always tuck the cartridge into your sleeping bag (though I've never done that). I've also used another kind of gas cooker in the Himalayas at altitudes of 5700m and temperatures almost down to -20 deg C. The propane/butane mixes these days does improve the performance of gas cookers at lower temps.

Where the Jetboil does fall apart is in its extreme sensitivity to wind. Don't believe the marketing - it's pretty pathetic in this regard. My Karrimor Go-System stove handles the wind better unshielded than the Jetboil behind a stone wall! I tuck in a home made aluminum foil shield under the sleeve that covers half of the flame area - this helps tremendously (just be very careful not to deflect heat onto the cartridge!). Another weakness is the piezoelectric lighter - I don't use it anymore - use a simple lighter instead.

Take nothing but litter, leave nothing but a cleaner Drakensberg.

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02 Jun 2010 12:36 #1332 by Scag
Scag replied to: Hiking stoves
I have decided to finally ditch my butane cooker. I do not want a cooker that uses gas, would rather have one that uses a liquid fuel.

My brother has an old coleman feather 400 primus, which he uses with benzine. This would be ideal, easy to use, boils fast.

Unfortunately, I havent been able to find anywhere to buy a primus. The only option it seems, is one of the MSR liquid fuel cookers (with the bottle). So I presume the MSR cookers are the best, but I detest them. Too much of a mission to put together, and it looks like they take a lot of space.

Anyone know where I can get a primus?

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02 Jun 2010 18:59 #1335 by nicolaasdekker
nicolaasdekker replied to: Hiking stoves
Not going to get a traditional multi fuel cooker in SA with the burner above the fuel tank.
My firt Primus (original swiss primus) I got from my dad and my others I bought from second hand shops, I reckon the best place to find is to either buy online from overseas or strike it lucky at a second hand shop.

However, I would recommend first using someones elses for a while. I have found that if I am hiking solo or in a duo it is not worth its weight. I only recommend using it if you are going to high altitudes and need to do heavy duty cooking like melting snow for drinking water.

I am starting to think more like an ultra lighter, willing to dispense with the F14 jet engine and wait a little longer for my water to boil.

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03 Jun 2010 09:30 #1337 by BergAttie
BergAttie replied to: Hiking stoves
Gents

I have both an MSR Whisperlite, a trangia spiritus cooker and an Australian version of the trangia. The best of the lot is the Ozzy spiritus cooker - kicks the MSr's but ito cooking time, weight/volume, simplicity, fuel economy and ease of set-up. I have tested against primus also - no comparison.

MSR is great for African trips because it burns petrol if you need to.

Ony draback of Oz cooker is that is can be hard to get hold of - Bush and Bundu in Maritzburg stock them from time to time.

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28 Jun 2010 13:00 - 28 Jun 2010 13:04 #1418 by mike
mike replied to: Hiking stoves
@ Scag....I went to Drifters last week looking for a solid fuel stove, had my mind set on the MSR Whisperlight having used it before i know its trustworthy an works well.BUT a new line of stoves have started coming to SA made by Edelrid, a German climbing manufacturer. I compared the MSR and the Edelrid hexon stoves and i Settled for the Edelrid. build quality looked much better, the pipe from the bottle was smaller and flexible and it has a multi connection..meaning you can use gas or a fuel bottle :) The Hexon is also lighter than the whisperlight but more comparable to the dragonfly. The gas and fuel bottle threads are the same standards as MSR so you can use MSR and jetboil gas on it to. It also folds up smaller than the MSR stove
Pricewise I payed R1400 for the stove with the fuel bottle, so its about R200 less than the whisperlight.
It also runs on white Gas , benzine or petrol
I went to the top of the Ampi this weekend for two nights and used the stove on Benzine and it worked like a dream!!! would recommend having a look before buying anything
Last Edit: 28 Jun 2010 13:04 by mike.

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30 Jun 2011 08:50 #3236 by Boerkie
Boerkie replied to: Hiking stoves
Have anyone tried the "Storm cooker" ?




It sells for R200 :woohoo:
Uses multiple liquid fuels and works good on a mentholated spirits mix with 15% water. You thus only need to carry the spirits and mix with water as you need it. The spirits comes in very hand for insect bites and blisters on trail.

My concern with most stoves, MSR included, is the amount of components it's made of. More with which things can go wrong.

Read the full report here.

www.trekandtrailsa.co.za/blog/2010/06/11/storm-cooker-for-hiking/#more-105

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30 Jun 2011 16:17 #3240 by intrepid
intrepid replied to: Hiking stoves
I also own an original Trangia from Sweden which is like the one above. They are great in their simplicity and robustness. But look at the weight and bulk - this is something I'm very picky about. The Jetboil weighs less and is less bulky even with the fuel cartridge.

As for the multi-fuels, Whisperlites and the likes....they don't whisper at all! :evil: How often don't I have to tolerate my friends using one and feeling like the cave is right next to an airport! And on more than one occasion they've presented serious mechanical problems.

Take nothing but litter, leave nothing but a cleaner Drakensberg.

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17 Oct 2011 08:01 #4383 by Boerkie
Boerkie replied to: Hiking stoves
I did a search on the forum and was surprised that there isn't a dedicated stove thread as there are much to be said on this topic.

The first discussion would probably be Canister stove vs Liquid Stove. Both have their Pro's and Con's and I would like to hear your opinions on this.

Secondly have any ever had a hiking stove explode or has something seriously went wrong.

Lastly, much can be said about windshields. I have tried to make a windshield for my canister stove that would be safe as windshields is not recommended for these. My idea was to use an empty canister and to use it up side down on top of the full canister. It sort of worked in the sense is blocked the wind and kept the heat away from the full canister but to my disappointment it did not better the cooking times at all. The usual Foil types you get at stores are so light that you need a windshield to shield them from blowing over. I'm sure there will be some good ideas by the members of this forum.

Thx

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