Hiking stoves

02 Dec 2011 13:39 #5087 by graemeka
Replied by graemeka on topic Re: Hiking stoves
@Boerkie

Last year July my group had a Campingaz CV270 canister with a Lumostar lantern attached that exploded in Ledgers cave sending shrapnel and melted plastic all over the place.

When the lantern was lit a flame started spouting from the area where the two connect, We couldn’t extinguish the flame or handle the lantern to turn of the valve.

Makes for a pretty loud bang!

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02 Dec 2011 14:33 #5088 by Boerkie
Replied by Boerkie on topic Re: Hiking stoves
Wow graemeka! I was beginning to think these stoves don't blow up and maybe they don't seeing that yours was a lantern. I think in the case you mention the lantern was not properly fixed to the canister or the o-ring was worn out. Either way I always do a double check before lighting a stove or lantern by 1. Listening for gas 2. Smelling for gas. Where did the melted plastic come from? I'm sure the bang made a couple of smugglers *&^% their pants :laugh:

F.Y.I the sharp smell of gas is not it's natural smell but artificially added as a safety feature.

Seems like plenty of guys on this site is using gas canister stoves and not the liquid ones, thought it would be the other way around. I was once told that gas canister stoves would not work on a berg winter hike but it now seems do-able.

It also seems common practice to use the stove inside the tent???? You sure have more guts than I do. I'll use it in the vestibule in emergencies but with plenty of ventilation.

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02 Dec 2011 19:13 #5090 by rinus
Replied by rinus on topic Re: Hiking stoves
@boerkie

On one of my first trips in my new treklite 3 it was pouring outside and the vestibule was overcrowded by 3 backpacks, so I made ready for making boiling water in the tent. Now I've got one of those gas canisters with the "lighter switch", well sometimes (actually most times) the thing only lights the stove after like the 5th or 6th click, so eventualy when the thing caught flame, the flame from the fumes were big enough to make a nice big hole in my mesh in the one side. :ohmy:

Fixed it after the trip, and still got patch there right above the sign that says "WARNING do not use open flame inside the tent!" :P

Ps 19:1 The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.

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02 Dec 2011 20:54 #5092 by graemeka
Replied by graemeka on topic Re: Hiking stoves
@Boerkie,
You are right; a proper inspection of the equipment would have prevented the incident. The melted plastic came from the base of the lantern; I am rather embarrassed to say that the flame burnt for 3-4 minutes before the canister exploded.
From my experience, lighting gas stoves are always more predictable than the fuel ones. But only in the vestibule, not brave enough to cook in the tent. :)

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03 Dec 2011 02:41 #5093 by Serious tribe
Replied by Serious tribe on topic Re: Hiking stoves
Usually cook in the bell when the weather is bad and behind a constructed rock screen when it is good, however we have cooked inside the tent on a few occasions for various unavoidable reasons. When doing this, we open the volume control incredible carefully and slowly so to avoid a flare up.

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06 Dec 2011 06:46 #5102 by Boerkie
Replied by Boerkie on topic Re: Hiking stoves
I lost my need to tempt fate with a gas stove when a couple of years back I blow up my groceries cupboard in a small hut we had on the farm. Whilst away for a long time a mouse must have chewed through the tubing running from the gas bottle that was situated outside the hut and ran behind the cupboard where it then splits to the gas fridge and stove. Lighting the gas fridge you had to push a red button for about a minute and the spark and then hold it again till the burner heads up. In the first stage you get a faint smell of gas which I suppose is natural but unknown to me the pipe was chewed and the back of the cupboard was now filling with gas.......spark......boooom!

That was not the end of it...... the hut got struck by lightning the same weekend ripping out the water pipes from inside the walls.
:blink:

Enjoy your tent cooking, I'll eat my 2 minute noodles raw :thumbsup:

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19 Nov 2012 05:54 - 19 Nov 2012 06:16 #55637 by Serious tribe
Replied by Serious tribe on topic Re: Hiking stoves
Here is a hiking stove system that i heard about yesterday. V interesting concept.

Possible problems - smoke, not enough hard carbon fuel on escarpment, bulky with the teg module. The image for size is a bit misleading as it does not show the side view with the module. There is also a larger stove version that would do well perhaps for communities without electricity.

biolitestove.com/campstove/camp-overview/tech-specs/#sub
Last edit: 19 Nov 2012 06:16 by Serious tribe.

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19 Nov 2012 08:13 #55640 by kbresler
Replied by kbresler on topic Hiking stoves
I have used a number of stoves over the years and some of my favourites include a Trangia (meths) and storm cooker (meths). They are simply reliable and without anything that can break or fail. Sadly though it refuses to light up when the temperature drops below -8. MSR Whisperlite is superb but has so many little bits that can get lost or stop working. Service needed constantly...
The last two years I have only packed one stove, MSR Pocket Rocket. It is small, lightweight and fits inside my pot. With a 4 season mix I have used it successfully up to 5900m without any hassles and have never had any issues with it. Love this little thing...

Then a question...
Optimus Stoves cannot be found on the SA market anymore for a number of reasons, the main one being cost. It is a Swiss stove and everything from there is just pricey. That being said, in my humble opinion these stoves are top notch. What is this forum's opinion on Optimus and will you invest in these if they were available locally again?

Kobus Bresler

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19 Aug 2013 13:08 - 19 Aug 2013 13:08 #58113 by Josh of the Bushveld
Replied by Josh of the Bushveld on topic Hiking stoves
Has anyone used solid-fuel/Hexamine (Esbit/Coghlans) stoves?
I've experimented with alcohol stoves (see the Home-made gear thread ) but I think solid-fuel may be even lighter than meths.
Last edit: 19 Aug 2013 13:08 by Josh of the Bushveld.

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19 Aug 2013 13:47 #58114 by ASL
Replied by ASL on topic Hiking stoves
I agree with MSR reliability. My Whisperlight has given me no trouble and I don't service it?!

I've had a Firefly for 8 years without a glitch and now got a Reactor (thanks to the CUM sale - I couldn't help myself) which is mind blowing and has been renamed "Flame Thrower" for boiling water in no time at all.

I read a test of quite a list of stoves that showed how much water each stove could boil with one small canister. Most only manage 12 litres, some good ones manage 15 litres but the MSR Reactor and Jetboil Helios stoves can do 24 litres... food for thought for the weight conscious!

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