Hiking stoves

16 Apr 2018 15:20 #73215 by diverian
Replied by diverian on topic Hiking stoves
Had a pocket rocket for many years and used it on the escarpment in minus figures many times. It is a good idea to put the gas canister in the bottom of your sleeping bag at night,
The following user(s) said Thank You: Papa Dragon, TheRealDave, ryanlynx

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
16 Apr 2018 17:37 #73218 by Papa Dragon
Replied by Papa Dragon on topic Hiking stoves
Thanks Adrian and Ian, that's the kind of info we're looking for..
The following user(s) said Thank You: AdrianT

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
16 Apr 2018 20:15 #73220 by Sterkhorn
Replied by Sterkhorn on topic Hiking stoves
@ Papa Dragon
I presume you are asking the question in order to determine if buying a normal stove (without heating coil) would be suitable in cold conditions.
I have a Go System Stove which still works in the cold, though less efficiently as the gas cylinder get colder.
What I have found is that if the cylinder is kept warm to start with (as Ian suggests), it will start well. The way I have got round the issue of keeping it warm, is to enclose the stove with a windshield which reflects the heat back onto the cylinder, so keeeping the temperature at an efficient burn level. Recently it still worked reasonably well in -13 degree temperatures.
Neil.
The following user(s) said Thank You: AdrianT, Andreas, Papa Dragon

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
17 Apr 2018 13:15 #73224 by Papa Dragon
Replied by Papa Dragon on topic Hiking stoves
Great info, thanks Neil

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
04 May 2018 20:57 #73388 by GerritHuman
Replied by GerritHuman on topic Hiking stoves

I have had a Kovea Spider for a few years, and am happy with the stove.

One of the features of the stove is that it has a heating coil, which apparently is useful at high altitude, and low temps, when one can invert the gas canister and the stove will still burn.

I have never had to do this, despite some pretty chilly escarpment hikes, the stove has never failed to work.

A guy that I hiked with recently was keen on the stove, but obviously Kovea is no longer available in SA.

So, my question is, has anyone had a stove like the MSR Pocket Rocket, or something similar, fail due to low temps or high altitude, with a butane propane mix? Not just hearsay please..

Cheers


Hi PapaD

Are you talking about the stove or the gas? If you are talking about the gas I've had a problem before.

On my first few hikes in the Berg I used a puncture Cadac hiking stove, and I remember on one of them it was below zero early in the morning when we watched the sun come up from the Amphi. I opened the stove and gas came out very very slowly. It made a flame but a very small one, something like a candle's flame. I thought the bottle was empty, but when I shake it there was still plenty gas in. Later that day the stove worked fine again. So I read about the problem that the bottles with Butane doesn't work well at low temperatures. But the more expensive bottles that has a mix (butane / propane) works better at lower temperatures.

I got this picture from zenstoves.com to show the difference:

Please login or register to view the image attached to this post.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
07 May 2018 12:40 #73396 by ASL
Replied by ASL on topic Hiking stoves
I can offer some feedback as I have Reactor for some years now. I also have an MSR Firefly which is a bit more robust than a Pocket Rocket and started off my Berg hiking 15 years ago with a Whisperlite that runs on a liquid fuel canister.

Basically the Reactor is by far the best performer. We dubbed it the "flamethrower"! on my first hike with it. I find the Firefly to be good basic stove but is much slower to get a boil going, especially in strong wind. I use a windshield but it's a mission. The Whisperlite is a really good machine but again is far slower and requires pumping to pressurise.

In hindsight I was happy with each stove until I got the next. Gas is more convenient and speed and hassle when you have had a long day matters too. In 2015 I went up Giants in extremely cold weather and snow and found that one of my small MSR gas cylinders "froze" and needed a few shakes before getting going. I've since bought once of those plastic feet/ stands so it doesn't rest on the ground. That's never happened since so I can say that I have had flawless performance from my Reactor and MSR kit.
The following user(s) said Thank You: ruthtbl, Papa Dragon

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
Powered by Kunena Forum